Cauliflower Mushroom Rice (Grain Free, AIP, Low-Carb)

Cauliflower Mushroom Rice (Grain Free, AIP, Low-Carb)

Cauliflower Mushroom Rice is a delicious grain free and low-carb side to any dish. The prep is super easy with frozen riced cauliflower (which can be found at most grocery stores) and pre sliced mushrooms!

Mushrooms don’t just add awesome flavour to this dish, but they’re also a great food to boost immune function.

According to a 2005 report published in the journal Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, mushrooms contain “compounds and complex substances with antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, antiallergic, immunomodulating, anti-inflammatory, antiatherogenic, hypoglycemic and hepatoprotective activities.”

To simplify, mushrooms can enhance almost every system in the body and protect you from numerous conditions and diseases since they’re associated with lowered inflammation. Sustaining high levels of inflammation long term has been shown to contribute to chronic conditions, such as heart & autoimmune disease, diabetes and cancer.

Note: Buy and eat organic grown mushrooms whenever possible since they’re very porous and have the tendency to easily absorb chemicals from the soil that they’re grown in.

What you need for this recipe

  • Frozen riced cauliflower
  • Sliced mushrooms
  • Onion
  • Parsley
  • Organic chicken stock
  • Avocado oil

 

Cauliflower Mushroom Rice

Cauliflower Mushroom Rice goes great with …

Mushroom “Rice”

Cauliflower Mushroom Rice is a delicious grain free and low-carb side to any dish. The prep is super easy with frozen riced cauliflower (which can be found at most grocery stores) and pre sliced mushrooms!
Prep Time: 5 mins
Cook Time: 15 mins
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: AIP, Keto, Low-Carb, Paleo
Servings: 2

Ingredients
 

  • 1 12 oz bag frozen riced cauliflower, I get mine from Costco
  • 1 pack sliced mushrooms
  • 1 small yellow onion, finely sliced
  • 2 tbsp fresh parsley, finely chopped
  • 1 and 1/4 cup organic chicken stock
  • 2 tbsp avocado oil
  • Sea salt & black pepper , to taste

Instructions
 

  • Saute mushrooms in 1 tbsp avocado oil for 2-minutes over medium heat. Season with salt and pepper. Add 1/4 cup chicken stock, cover and let cook for 5-minutes. Remove lid and allow remaining liquid to cook off. Set mushrooms aside in a bowl.
  • Using the same pan, add 1 tbsp avocado oil and saute onion until fragrant over medium heat.
  • Add frozen riced cauliflower and combine until slightly heated. Season with salt.
  • Add 1/4 cup of chicken stock to the pan at a time. Let liquid evaporate before adding more stock. Do this until you get through 1 cup of stock. Continue to stir ingredients as you do this.
  • Add mushrooms and parsley to the pan, combine everything together and let cook for another minute. Remove from heat and serve.

Cauliflower Mushroom Rice

Sautéed Lemon & Pine Nut Kale (Plant-Based, High-Fiber, Low-Carb)

Sautéed Lemon & Pine Nut Kale (Plant-Based, High-Fiber, Low-Carb)

To be honest, before this recipe I really wasn’t a big fan of kale–and the only way I would incorporate it into my diet was by hiding it in a smoothie.

The BF managed to change my mind about kale in our early dating days …

It was Halloween 2018 and I was heading to his house for the very first time. The plan was to dress-up and hand out candy to the trick-or-treaters in his neighbourhood.

I showed up as Organic Farmer Jen (no surprise there) and he dressed up as Superman (padded abs, biceps, quads and all).

We really didn’t discuss dinner plans before I arrived (I was mentally prepared to eat my stash of organic dark chocolate and SmartSweets for dinner), but to my surprise this man had some dinner ideas up his jacked Superman sleeves.

He busted out a gluten free keto pizza from the freezer and then grabbed a bunch of kale from the fridge. Now, the kale didn’t excite me as much as the pizza did, BUT I was extremely impressed that this bachelor had something green in his fridge and was prepared to do something with it.

I decided not to mention that I wasn’t a big fan of kale, afterall I did show up as Organic Farmer Jen and what organic farmer doesn’t eat kale, right?!

So, after 10-minutes of methodical kale prep and warming up keto pizza, there we were, the organic farmer and jacked Superman enjoying our first at home dinner–that he made!!!

I realized two important things that night:

  1. I actually do like kale, I just needed the right combo of ingredients to make it tickle my palate.
  2. Jacked Superman and his kale recipe might be keepers!

We now make this kale recipe on a regular–and I enjoy it just as much today as I did when I tried it for the very first time.

The combination of lemon, garlic, pine nuts and olive oil makes kale exciting and flavourful. It’s the perfect low-carb, high-fiber side to any fish or meat dish (or gluten free keto pizza!).

Give it a try and leave me a comment below with your thoughts!

Sautéed Lemon & Pine Nut Kale (Plant-Based, High-Fiber, Low-Carb)

Sautéed Lemon & Pine Nut Kale

INGREDIENTS: (serves 3-4)
1 bunch leafy kale, chopped
1/4 cup pine nuts
1/2 lemon, juice only
1 garlic clove, thinly sliced
2 tbsp avocado oil
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
Sea salt to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:
1. In a large stove-top pan saute garlic in avocado oil until fragrant.
2. Add kale to pan. Use tongs to coat kale in oil and garlic. Add sea salt.
3. Once kale has wilted down, add pine nuts and allow them to toast slightly.
4. Add in lemon juice, turn off burner then finish with olive oil. Toss one last time and serve.

Sautéed Lemon & Pine Nut Kale

Green Pea Soup (Plant-Based, High-Fiber)

Green Pea Soup (Plant-Based, High-Fiber)

DID YOU KNOW? Green peas are part of the legume family and contain beneficial nutrients and fiber (which feeds the gut flora), BUT they also contain antinutrients.

Antinutrients are substances found in many foods, including legumes and grains, that may interfere with digestion and mineral absorption.

While these generally aren’t a concern for most healthy people, their health effects are still important to keep in mind. They are more likely to impact those who rely on legumes as a staple food, those with IBS or other gut issues, and individuals at risk of malnutrition.

Here are two antinutrients found in legumes:

PHYTIC ACID: May interfere with the absorption of minerals such as iron, calcium, zinc and magnesium.

LECTINS: Associated with symptoms such as gas and bloating and may interfere with nutrient absorption.

How to help prevent adverse effects from antinutrients in legumes:

LIMIT CONSUMPTION: It’s best to limit consumption of legumes to 3-4 times a week. Also limit the quantity you consume in one sitting since a larger amount is more likely to cause problems (I recommend 1/3 to 1/2 a cup as a max).

PREPARE PROPERLY: Soaking and/or sprouting may be helpful in reducing the amounts of antinutrients in legumes. At the very least soak your legumes for 18-hours before cooking.

COOK THOROUGHLY: Antinutrient levels are higher in raw legumes, which makes them more likely to cause digestive issues. Cooking legumes helps to reduce antinutrients.

In summary, while legumes do contain beneficial nutrients and fiber, they are not as nutrient-dense as other foods—like meats, fish, shellfish, eggs and vegetables—and, as mentioned above, some of the nutrients they contain are not bioavailable due to antinutrients. For this reason and others mentioned above, legumes are not a staple in my diet and I only consume them once in a blue moon.

If you choose to consume legumes, I recommend that you pay attention to how you feel when you consume them. If they don’t energize you or if they cause digestive problems, it’s best to avoid them for a period of time and try reintroducing them at a later date.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Levels of antinutrients tend to be lower in peas than in other legumes, so they are unlikely to cause problems unless you eat them frequently or in excess.

Now that we got all the important stuff out of the way, it’s time to try my Green Pea Soup. It’s absolutely delicious–and a great side dish for the spring & summer.

green pea soupGreen Pea Soup

INGREDIENTS: (serves 4)
5 cup frozen green peas
350g bag frozen cauliflower (or 1/2 head fresh)
½ yellow onion, chopped
5 cups organic/homemade chicken or vegetable stock
2 cloves garlic, sliced
2 tbsp avocado oil
2 tbsp apple cider vinegar or lemon juice
1/2 tsp dried parsley
1/2 tsp dried dill
Sea salt and black pepper, to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Sauté onion and garlic in avocado over medium heat until onion is translucent.
2. Add dill and parsley and sauté for another minute.
3. Add all remaining ingredients, cover the pot and bring to a boil over high heat. Once boiling, uncover and reduce the heat to low. Let the soup simmer for 15-minutes.
4. Transfer the soup to a blender (or use an immersion blender) and blend on high until smooth and creamy.
5. Transfer to bowls and serve as desired. Store leftovers in a mason jar in the fridge for up to one week.

Turn your soups into a complete and nutrient-rich meal in one easy step …

? Stir 2 scoops of collagen powder into your bowl of soup. Collagen is loaded with nutrients that support skin, hair, nails, joints and the gut lining. Boost all your soups and smoothies with this powerful ingredient!

green pea soup

Simple Sautéd Cabbage (AIP, Plant-Based, Keto)

Simple Sautéd Cabbage (AIP, Plant-Based, Keto)

DID YOU KNOW? Cabbage is a great weight loss vegetable since it’s packed with many beneficial vitamins, minerals, plus water and fiber.

It’s also low in calories, containing only 33 calories per cup of cooked cabbage.

Cabbage is full of gut-friendly insoluble fiber, a type of carbohydrate that can’t be broken down in the intestines. Insoluble fiber helps support digestive health by adding bulk to stools and promoting regular bowel movements.

In addition, it’s rich in soluble fiber, which has been shown to increase the number of beneficial bacteria in the gut , like Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli.

Enjoy cabbage on its own or use it various dishes including:

Simple Sautéd Cabbage

INGREDIENTS: (serves 2)
1/2 head green cabbage, thinly sliced
1 tbsp avocado oil
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
Sea salt & black pepper to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Using a deep pan heat avocado oil, add cabbage and season with sea salt.

2. Cook at medium heat until cabbage begins to brown slightly.

3. Remove from heat and mix in olive oil, apple cider vinegar and black pepper. Add more salt if needed.

IMG_20200109_161120~2.jpg

Tostones (AIP, Gluten & Grain Free, High-Fiber)

Tostones (AIP, Gluten & Grain Free, High-Fiber)

DID YOU KNOW? Consuming plantains is a great way to relieve constipation and provide relief from hemorrhoids and digestive conditions like diverticulitis since they are high in fiber.

One cup of plantains contains 25-30 grams of fiber! The fiber and starch found in plantains are complex carbs.

Fiber and complex carbs are less processed and more slowly digested than the simple carbs found in processed foods. They keep you fuller and more satisfied for longer after a meal, which can be helpful for weight loss and management.

Cooked plantains are also a rich source of vitamins A, C, and B-6, and the minerals magnesium and potassium.

Although they may look like bananas, plantains are starchier, contain less sugar and are much more versatile as a cooking ingredient. Also, unlike bananas, plantains are typically cooked before eating.

How to prep plantains for cooking:

1. Use a paring knife, chop off ends of the plantain.
2. Score the sides of the plantain (lengthwise) all the way down.
3. Dig your thumb between the peel and plantain to remove each section of the peel.
4. Remove any remaining skin/peel using the knife.
5. From there you can dice, slice or use the plantain whole (depending on what the recipe calls for).

One of my favourite ways to enjoy plantains is in the form of tostones! Tostones are slices of unripe plantains, fried, flattened, then fried again.

They’re super easy and quick to make and only require 3 ingredients! Check out the recipe below.

Here are a few ways you can enjoy tostones:

  • As a snack or appetizer.
  • Dipped in guacamole or your favourite healthy dipping sauce.
  • As a breakfast side, along with bacon, eggs, and avocado.
  • With Picadillo
  • As a side to Latin American-style dishes or with any other meat dish.
Tostones

INGREDIENTS: (serves 2-3)
2 green (or slightly yellow) plantains, cut into 1-inch slices
1/4 cup avocado oil (more if needed)
Sea salt

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Cover the bottom of a large frying pan with avocado oil. Heat at medium-high.

2. Add plantain slices and fry on both sides until golden (roughly 2-3 minutes per side).⁠ Season with salt.

3. Remove plantains from pan and gently smash between 2 pieces of parchment paper until flattened. You can use the bottom of a mug or plate to smash.

4. Add smashed plantains back to the pan (add more oil if needed) and fry again on both sides until golden brown (roughly 2 minutes per side).

img_20200124_1819242

Beet Mash (Low-Carb, Dairy Free, Plant-Based)

Beet Mash (Low-Carb, Dairy Free, Plant-Based)

DID YOU KNOW? Beets are an excellent source of disease-fighting phytonutrients called betalains which have powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

Betalains are also responsible for providing beets with their vibrant color. Studies show that these potent pigments may help protect against the development of certain types of cancer and disease.

Try my Beet Mash recipe below. It’s versatile and can be enjoyed warm or cold …

  • Use as a side to your meat or fish dishes.
  • Enjoy topped with fried eggs.
  • Use as a dip or spread for crackers, sliced veggies or wraps.
  • Mix with canned wild fish for a quick and healthy meal.

Looking for more ways to add beets to your diet? Try this Beet & Blueberry Smoothie!

Beet Mash

INGREDIENTS: (serves 2-3)
2 cups beets, peeled & sliced (or 1 bag frozen beets)
1/2 head cauliflower, chopped
4 carrots, peeled & chopped
2 tbsp avocado oil
3/4 cup full fat coconut milk, canned
1 tsp dried rosemary
Sea salt and black pepper to taste

NOTE: You can also use 1 full head cauliflower and no carrots. Both ways taste great!

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Place vegetables on baking sheet with oil and spices and bake at 350F for 30-45 minutes.

2. Put cooked vegetables in a food processor or high-powered blender with coconut milk and mix until a smooth mash is formed.

3. Use right away or store in fridge for use during the week.

img_20191112_085247